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Charing Cross Road

Charing Cross Road is a street in central London running immediately north of St Martin-in-the-Fields to St Giles Circus (the intersection with Oxford Street) and then becomes Tottenham Court Road. It is so called because it serves Charing Cross railway station (named for the nearby Charing Cross). Charing Cross Road was developed, in conjunction with Shaftesbury Avenue, by the Metropolitan Board of Works under an 1877 Act of Parliament at a cost of £778,238....

Charing railway station

Charing railway station serves Charing in Kent, England. The station, and all trains serving it, is operated by Southeastern. The ticket office is manned only during part of the day; at other times a PERTIS 'permit to travel' machine, located outside the station building on the 'down' side, suffices. The next station eastwards (towards Ashford) used to be Hothfield, however it was closed in 1959, although it remained a 'request' stop for railway staff throughout the 1960s....

Charing Cross roof collapse

On 5 December 1905, the iron-and-glass overall arched roof of London Charing Cross collapsed during a long-term maintenance project, killing six people. Background The original roof was designed by Sir John Hawkshaw and comprised a single-span trussed arch with wrought iron tie rods. The roof was 164ft wide by 510ft long and was designed as a contained arch, with bowstring principals. Collapse At on 5 December 1905 one of the tie-rods of a main principal sheared, making a loud noise. Some passengers evacuated the station, although many remained....

Charing, Tibet

Charing is a village in the Tibet Autonomous Region of China. It lies at an altitude of 5021 metres (16,476 feet). The village has a population of about 476....

Charing Windmill

Charing Windmill is a Grade II listed house converted smock mill on Charing Hill in Kent in southeast England. It is sometimes known as Field Mill, but that name was also used by a watermill in Charing. History Charing Mill was built in the early nineteenth century. It was marked on the 1819-43 Ordnance Survey map and also on Greenwood's 1821 map of Kent. It was working until 1891, when the business was transferred to Field Watermill, although two new common sails had been erected on the mill by Holman's of Canterbury the year before....

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