Rome (Paris Métro)

The selectable images and pictures further below show material related to Rome (Paris Métro). Rome is a station on Paris Métro Line 2 on the border of the 8th and 17th arrondissement of Paris.

The station was opened on 7 October 1902 as part of the extension of line 2 from Étoile to Anvers. The name is that of one of several streets in the area named for European capitals, in this case Rome, capital of Italy.

Nearby are the town hall of the 17th arrondissement and the Institut Universitaire de Formation des Maîtres (teachers' college).

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Close places of interest

Théâtre Hébertot (0.23 km)

Théâtre Hébertot is a theatre at 78, boulevard des Batignolles, in the 17th arrondissement of Paris, France. The theatre, completed in 1838 and opening as the Théâtre des Batignolles, was later renamed Théâtre des Arts in 1907. It acquired its present name in 1940 after playwright and journalist Jacques Hébertot. Théâtre Hébertot has a seating capacity of 630 for the main stage, and completed construction on a smaller stage, l'Petit Hébertot, in 2001. The Hebertot is one of the few Paris theaters that has shows in English as well as French.

Europe (Paris Métro) (0.4 km)

Europe is a station on Paris Métro Line 3. The station opened on 19 October 1904, nine days after the first section of Line 3 opened between Père Lachaise and Villiers. It is named after the Place d'Europe, a square from which streets named for various capitals of European countries radiate. This was the site of the first railway station in Paris, known as the embarcadère de l'Ouest ("platform of the west"), the temporary terminus of the Compagnie du Chemin de fer de Paris à Saint-Germain, opened in 1837. The new terminus of Gare Saint-Lazare replaced it from 1842.

Place de Clichy (Paris Métro) (0.43 km)

Place de Clichy is a station of the Paris Métro, serving Paris Metro Line 2 and Line 13 at the junction of the 8th and 17th arrondissement of Paris. The station was opened on 7 October 1902 as part of the extension of line 2 from Étoile to Anvers. The Place was named after the Barrière de Clichy, a gate built on the road to the village of Clichy for the collection of taxation as part of the Wall of the Farmers-General; the gate was built between 1784 and 1788 and demolished in the 19th century.

Liège (Paris Métro) (0.47 km)

Liège is a station on line 13 of the Paris Métro on the border of the 8th and 9th arrondissements. It was built as part of the Nord-Sud Company's Line B from Saint-Lazare to Porte de Saint-Ouen and opened on 26 February 1911 as Berlin, named after the nearby Rue Berlin. As the Rue d'Amsterdam, which the line runs under at this point, is too narrow to accommodate platforms across from each other, the station was built with offset platforms. It was closed on 1 August 1914 at the beginning of World War I.

Villiers (Paris Métro) (0.55 km)

Villiers is a station of the Paris Métro, serving Line 2 and Line 3 on the border of the 8th and 17th arrondissement of Paris. The Line 2 platforms opened on 21 January 1903, although trains had been operating between Étoile and Anvers since 7 October 1902. On 19 October 1904, it became the terminus for the first section of line 3, the other terminus being Père Lachaise. When first built, the platforms for line 3 were parallel and at the same height as those for line 2.

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