Rego Park, Queens

The selectable maps and aerial photographs below present material about Rego Park, Queens. Rego Park is an upper middle class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens.

Geography

Rego Park is bordered to the north by Elmhurst and Corona, the east and south by Forest Hills and the west by Middle Village.

Street maps and aerial photographs

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More information about Rego Park, Queens

Weather forecast (United States)

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History

A swath of farmland until the early 20th century, the area that came to be called Rego Park was once populated by Dutch & German farmers who sold their produce in Manhattan. Later, the farmers were Chinese, and sold their goods exclusively to Chinatown.

Rego Park was named after the Real Good Construction Company, which began development of the area in the mid-1920s. "Rego" comes from the first two letters of the first two words of the Real Good Construction Company. The company built 525 eight-room houses costing $8,000 each, stores were built in 1926 on Queens Boulevard and 63rd Drive, and apartment buildings were built in 1927–28.

Like its neighbor, Forest Hills, Rego Park has long had a significant Jewish population, most of which have Georgian and Russian Jewish ancestors, with a number of synagogues and kosher restaurants. Cartoonist Art Spiegelman grew up in Rego Park and made it the setting for significant scenes involving his aged father in Maus, his graphic novel about the Holocaust. Many Holocaust survivors, including Spiegelman's parents, settled there after 1945. Even as many Jews have departed for further-flung suburbs over the years, they have been replaced by Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union, especially from Central Asia. Though these immigrants largely trace their ethnic roots back to Bukharan Jewish culture, the effect of life in the Soviet Union on the population has led Rego Park to have a Russian feel with many signs in Russian Cyrillic. Most of the Bukharan Jewish immigrants in the neighborhood come from Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, and it is possible to find excellent, authentic Uzbek and Tajik cuisine in many Rego Park restaurants. Immigrant populations from Albania, Israel, Romania, Iran, Colombia, South Asia, China, Bulgaria and South Korea are also well represented.

Aside from the many apartment buildings, multi-family, and railroad houses which make up Rego Park, some houses in Rego Park are in the colonial and Tudor styles with slate roofs. This is especially so in an area called the Crescents, named for its semicircular shaped streets emanating in a concentric pattern from Alderton Street, between Woodhaven Boulevard and the Long Island Rail Road. There is easy access to Manhattan via the 63rd Drive subway stop, which provides immediate access to the Broadway and Nassau Street lines and ready access to the Sixth and Eighth Avenue express lines and the 42nd Street local.

Community Groups/Civic Associations

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Close places of interest

Rego Park (LIRR station) (0.27 km)

Rego Park is a former Long Island Rail Road station. It was made of wood, unlike most other stations that were concrete. The station opened in May 1928 with two side platforms outside the two Rockaway Beach Branch tracks that bracketed the four-track Main Line, so only Rockaway trains stopped there. After the Rockaway Trestle fire in 1950, the line was closed station by station. The station closed on June 8, 1962, one day before the Rockaway Beach Branch was abandoned. Nothing remains at the site today.

63rd Drive – Rego Park (IND Queens Boulevard Line) (0.72 km)

63rd Drive – Rego Park is a local station on the IND Queens Boulevard Line of the New York City Subway, located at 63rd Drive and Queens Boulevard in the Rego Park neighborhood of Queens. It is served by the R train at all times except late nights, when the E train replaces it as the local along Queens Boulevard. The M train provides additional service here on weekdays. This underground station, opened on December 31, 1936, has four tracks and two side platforms. The two center express tracks are used by the E train during daytime hours and the F train at all times.

Forest Hills Gardens, Queens (0.88 km)

Forest Hills Gardens is a planned community located in Forest Hills, in the New York City borough of Queens. Its streets are privately owned but open to traffic. The northern border runs along the Long Island Rail Road tracks, the eastern along Union Turnpike, and the remaining borders form an irregular line from the stadium at the West Side Tennis Club to near the intersection of Union Turnpike and Kessel Street. Plan The area consists of a development, fashioned after a traditional English village, that is one of America's oldest planned communities.

Area code 929 (0.93 km)

North American area code 929 is a New York state telephone area code which overlays area codes 718, 347, and 917 in the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island, as well as the Marble Hill section of Manhattan. The exhaustion of phone numbers in the area led Neustar, the coordinator of the North American Numbering Plan, to announce, and New York State's Public Service Commission to approve, 929 in January 2010. The new code is for landlines and mobile devices. The addition of 929 means there are six New York City area codes (212, 347, 646, 718, 917, and 929).

Bramson ORT College (1 km)

Bramson ORT College is an undergraduate college in New York City operated by ORT America and US ORT Operations, the American branch of the Jewish charity World ORT. Its main campus is in Forest Hills, Queens, with a satellite campus in Brooklyn. Bramson ORT College opened in 1977 at a location on 23rd Street and Park Avenue South in Manhattan, to provide technical education at the college level. Bramson ORT College is accredited by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York.

Other mentions of Rego Park, Queens

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Sources

Text based information has been extracted from various Wikipedia articles. Weather data is provided by OpenWeatherMap. Location distances have been calculated based on Wikipedia information. Thanks to Google Maps, BING and OSM (Open Street Map) for map related material.

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