Lake Okareka

The maps and aerial photographs on this page show information about Lake Okareka. Lake Okareka is one of four small lakes lying between Lake Rotorua and Lake Tarawera, in the Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand's North Island. The others are Lake Rotokakahi (Green Lake), Lake Tikitapu (Blue Lake), and Lake Okataina. All lie within the Okataina caldera, along its western edge.

The lake has a circumference of 6 miles and lies about 60 metres above Lake Tarawera. Its outlet flows underground for half a mile and forms the Waitangi waterfall. In fact, the Okareka lake seems to be connected with the Tarawera by underground channels.

Maps and images

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More information about Lake Okareka

Weather conditions (New Zealand)

Current weather conditions are described as with temperature about degrees centigrade and wind speed of km/h.

History

This small and little-visited lake is a place of much charm, surrounded by hills nearly everywhere thickly wooded. It is quite near, but out of sight from the tourist motor route of Rotorua and Tarawera; a side road gives access to it. Anglers find good sport there, but otherwise its solitude is not disturbed yet. Many years ago a settler acquired some of the land around it, and built his house on a low-lying isthmus which connects an island-like hill in the middle of the lake with the mainland. Some of the frontage is still in private hands, but the greater part of the sylvan basin in which the lake lies has now become residential property.

Okareka means "the lake of sweet food". In early times, Māori grew sweet potatoes or kumara around the outside of the lake. It first described in print by Sir George Grey, and poetic mention of it is made by Domett in his “Ranolf and Amohia.” Grey visited it on the course of his travels through the Lakes Country to Taupo in the summer of 1849-50. The journey is described in that rare little book entitled “Journal of an expedition Overland from Auckland to Taranaki”, written for the Governor by his secretary G. S. Cooper, with a translation into Maori by his interpreter, Piri-kawau; the book was published in Auckland in 1851. In those days the route from Ohinemutu to Tarawera was a track which skirted the shore of Okareka and reached the large lake near the mission station called Kariri (Galilee). It was a blistering hot day when Governor Grey and his party took the foot trail from Rotorua to Tarawera, and the narrator says they were “nearly stewed”.

Wikipedia contains more information about Lake Okareka.

Close places of interest

Lake Tikitapu (4.72 km)

Lake Tikitapu or Blue Lake, is the smallest of four small lakes lying between Lake Rotorua and Lake Tarawera in the Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand's North Island. The others are Lake Rotokakahi (Green Lake), Lake Okareka, and Lake Okataina. Along with the others, Lake Tikitapu lies within a volcanic caldera formed within the last 300,000 years. The blue colour of the lake can be attributed to rhyolite and pumice on the lake bed. The lake has no visible outlet, however subsurface flow drains towards Lake Tarawera.

Te Wairoa (5.15 km)

Te Wairoa, also known as The Buried Village is located close to the shore of Lake Tarawera in New Zealand's North Island. It was a Māori and European settlement where visitors would stay on their way to visit the Pink and White Terraces. The village was destroyed by the eruption of the volcano Mount Tarawera on June 10, 1886. 120 people died in the eruption, many of them in other villages closer to the volcano. The Buried Village is open to the public and shows the excavated ruins of the village, recovered relics on display in a museum and the history of the eruption.

Lake Rotokakahi (6.28 km)

Lake Rotokakahi or Green Lake, is one of four small lakes lying between Lake Rotorua and Lake Tarawera in the Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand's North Island. The others are Lake Tikitapu (Blue Lake), Lake Okareka, and Lake Okataina. All lie within the Okataina caldera, along its western edge. Named for its abundance of kakahi (freshwater mussels), it flows to Lake Tarawera via the Te Wairoa waterfalls. From the air the lake looks emerald green due to its shallow, sandy bottom. The lake is 1302 feet above sea level and 69 feet below the level of the neighbouring Lake Tikitapu.

Lake Okataina (7.08 km)

Lake Okataina is the northernmost and largest of four smaller lakes lying between Lake Rotorua and Lake Tarawera in the Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand's North Island. The others are Lake Rotokakahi (Green Lake), Lake Tikitapu (Blue Lake), and Lake Okareka. All lie within the Okataina caldera, along its western edge. Unlike many other lakes in the region, Lake Okataina is completely encircled by native forest. It also has no inlets or outlets. Perhaps as a result, over the past 30 years, the level of the lake has risen and fallen in a range of about 5 metres.

Ohinemutu (7.53 km)

Ohinemutu is a suburb in Rotorua, New Zealand. It was originally a Māori village. In the 2006 Census, there were 282 people living in Ohinemutu.

Other mentions of Lake Okareka

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Sources

Text based information has been extracted from thousands of Wikipedia articles. Weather data is provided by OpenWeatherMap. Location distances have been calculated based on Wikipedia information. Thanks to Google Maps, BING and OSM (Open Street Map) for map related material.

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